“VCL BUSINESS CLUB” : SOME NEWS FROM FRANCE - WEEK 44

Gratuit
Recevez toutes nos informations et actualités par Email.

Entrez votre adresse email:

Labour pains

Two cases that help explain France’s high unemployment

CALM has returned to the streets and petrol to the pumps. But for all the turmoil and tear gas that the government’s mild pension reform prompted, it has left intact an underlying social model based on high taxes and onerous rules for firms and employees, plus generous benefits. Two recent controversies expose the wide gap between what the French expect and what foreign businesses will bear.

Last month Ryanair, an Irish low-cost airline, announced that it is to shut its only base in France, in Marseille, in January 2011. Some 200 jobs will be transferred out of France and 13 routes will be closed, including the one to Paris. This is not because of low demand. Since 2006 Ryanair’s passenger traffic to and from Marseille has jumped eightfold, to 1.7m, as French travellers snap up flights at a fraction of the prices charged by Air France. Rather, Ryanair is leaving as a pre-emptive response to a decision by prosecutors to investigate it for breaching French labour law.

Ryanair was employing 200 cabin staff and pilots in Marseille on Irish labour contracts, which are less burdensome than French ones. This is in line with European Union rules on mobile transport workers, the company argues, since the employees were on Irish “territory” (planes), working for a company resident in Ireland, where they were paid. That may have pushed the rules to the limit, but it made business sense. The tax “wedge” (the gap between what an employer pays and the employee receives) is as much as three times bigger in France than in Ireland.

The French were enraged. “A company with cowboy methods,” fumed La Provence, a local paper. The unions accused the firm of using illegal labour and of social dumping. Ryanair decided to pull out before it got to court. The prosecutors, declared Michael O’Leary, Ryanair’s boss, had “cost Marseille and France jobs, foreign investment and lost visitors”.

There was equal indignation over another foreign firm, Molex, an American electronic-parts maker that supplies the car industry. Last year Molex decided to close its French plant near Toulouse, which had been unprofitable for years. It agreed redundancy packages, which have so far cost it €30m ($42m), and helped finance alternative employment. But in September 188 former employees filed a suit against Molex, contesting their redundancy.

Molex promptly suspended further redundancy payments, arguing that it faced too much uncertainty over future costs. By chance, last week the group reported net profits in the three months to the end of September of $75m, after a loss in the same period of 2009. This sent the unions into a fury, and Christian Estrosi, the industry minister, to their defence. He called the firm’s behaviour “scandalous” and ordered French carmakers, including PSA Peugeot Citroën, a private company, to stop doing business with Molex. For its part, Molex denounced the “aggressive” approach of the French government and its “negative attitude to business and foreign investment”.

France is popular with foreign investors thanks to its skilled workforce and excellent infrastructure. But many complain that labour law and heavy payroll taxes deter job creation. Bosses believe some workers try to get fired in order to win generous tax-free redundancy. Small firms buy machinery to avoid taking on staff. Yet most French reporting of these two cases, egged on by Mr Estrosi, has drawn a caricature of wicked bosses twisting the rules to exploit workers. Producer sympathy triumphs over consumer interest. And suspicion of profit precludes sensible discussion of the cost to France in lost jobs.

http://www.economist.com/node/17421434?story_id=17421434

 

France to Investigate LVMH Stake in Hermès

France’s stock market regulator said Friday that it would investigate how LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton had acquired — without any notice — 17.1 percent of Hermès International.

LVMH, the world’s largest maker of luxury goods, surprised investors last month when it announced that it suddenly had a $2 billion stake in its smaller rival. Normally, companies in France, as in other countries, have to declare their stakes before they obtain so many shares.

But LVMH had used derivatives over nearly two years to build up claims on shares of Hermès, known for its scarves and Birkin bags, without actually buying millions of the shares until the last moment.

In an interview with a French radio station on Friday, Jean-Pierre Jouyet, the chairman of the regulator, Autorité des marchés financiers, or AMF, said that “an inquiry will be opened.”

“French regulation should be as tough as in other countries, and it’s not,” Mr. Jouyet said. He added that often, France is the Wild West “in terms of taking control of companies, and going over thresholds.”

He said that “every kind of financial instrument that allows one to buy the shares of another company has to be declared. I don’t want make any exceptions, and the rules have to be adapted to that.”

“We live in a complicit capitalism in this country, with a double standard, two sets of rules, which is not normal.”

LVMH said in response to the regulator’s announcement that it was “confident that this inquiry will establish, as the group has always affirmed, that these operations were made in full respect of current regulations.”

French firms are required to notify markets when their stake in another firm passes the thresholds of 5, 10 and 15 percent.

http://dealbook.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/05/france-to-investigate-lvmh-stake-in-hermes/?scp=5&sq=france&st=cse

 

Les divorces accroissent le chômage des hommes

Une étude analyse les influences des séparations conjugales sur les trajectoires professionnelles.

Les séparations conjugales influencent-elles les trajectoires professionnelles  ? Deux chercheuses de l’Institut national des études démographiques (Ined) et une statisticienne de l’Insee ont tenté de répondre à cette question, alors que le phénomène est en plein essor. Pour 100 mariages prononcés, le taux de divorce est passé de 11 à 45,1 % entre 1950 et 2008, sans compter les ruptures de couples non mariés, qui est actuellement la forme d’union la plus fréquente.

En observant la situation professionnelle l’année qui précède et les deux années qui suivent la séparation, l’étude montre que les femmes inactives ont largement tendance à reprendre à un emploi. Si 56 % des inactives le demeurent après la séparation, 44 % se présentent sur le marché du travail et 37 % travaillent effectivement l’année qui suit la séparation. Trois quart de ces dernières occupent un emploi à temps plein. Une reprise du travail qui s’explique par la baisse de niveau de vie qui suit généralement un divorce chez les femmes. Leur revenu médian diminuerait de 32 % en France dans l’année qui suit le divorce.

L’influence de l’âge des enfants

Pour les hommes aussi, la séparation n’est pas sans conséquence. Elle accroit notamment les risques de chômage, au moins dans les deux ans qui suivent. Une tendance que les chercheurs expliquent par une forme de mise à distance avec le monde du travail  : « la perte par l’homme de son rôle de pourvoyeur de ressources peut entraîner un affaiblissement de son attachement au marché du travail ». Le fait qu’un divorce soit souvent un évènement stressant peut aussi se répercuter sur le travail.

Dernière hypothèse évoquée dans l’étude : « Une fois sans conjointe, l’homme doit réaliser de nouvelles tâches domestiques auparavant effectuées par la femme. Ces nouvelles contraintes devraient se traduire par une baisse de son temps marchand qui peut accroître son risque de chômage s’il s’investit moins dans la sphère professionnelle ».

Les couples dans lequel le mari est seul pourvoyeur de revenu sont les plus affectés par à une séparation. La répartition traditionnelle des tâches « est une stratégie risquée, pour les hommes comme pour les femmes, dans le contexte actuel de séparation élevé », souligne les auteurs de l’étude.

Le retour sur le marché du travail observé chez les femmes est aussi influencé par l’âge des enfants, la probabilité de reprise d’activité étant moins importante pour les femmes avec un enfant en bas âge (moins de deux ans). Les problèmes de garde et de conciliation entre vie familiale et vie professionnelle sont en effet plus importants quand on les assume seule. En revanche, le nombre d’enfants ne semble pas jouer sur le retour à l’emploi.

http://www.lesechos.fr/economie-politique/france/actu/020913476668-les-divorces-accroissent-le-chomage-des-hommes.htm

 

Immobilier: l’écart se creuse entre les villes et les campagnes

Les prix des logements anciens ont progressé de 6,3% au deuxième trimestre. Ce chiffre cache des disparités régionales fortes.

“Le redressement du marché immobilier ancien est réel”, souligne la note de conjoncture des Notaires de France, qui publie mardi ses chiffres trimestriels en partenariat avec l’Institut national de la statistique (Insee). Les prix des appartements anciens ont augmenté de 6,3% en France au deuxième trimestre 2010 sur un an, stimulés par la hausse du marché parisien qui a atteint 9,8%.

Les évolutions des prix au deuxième trimestre sont toutefois très disparates selon les régions. Ils ont progressé de 4,3% en province mais ont grimpé de 8,6% en Ile-de-France. Certains départements profitent largement de cette embellie comme les Vosges (+14,5% sur un an), le Gard (+11,7%) et la Charente-Maritime (+10,4%).

Par contre le marché des appartements anciens baisse de 10,1% dans l’Ain, de 6,2% dans le Pas-de-Calais, de 5,3% dans le Doubs et le Morbihan. C’est Mulhouse, dans le Haut-Rhin, qui enregistre la plus forte baisse des prix, avec -12,4% sur un an. Inversement, le marché flambe de 19,9% à Avignon et de 22% dans les Alpes-de-Haute-Provence.

Les départements ruraux à la peine

Pour les maisons, le marché est toujours à la baisse en Lozère, dans les Landes, les Deux-Sèvres, la Meuse, l’Allier et le Cher, qui connaissent des évolutions négatives de prix comprises entre -4% à -13%.

A contrario, les départements de la Gironde, la Drôme, la Loire Atlantique, la Marne et la Seine-Maritime connaissent des augmentations de prix de plus de 10%. “La reprise ne semble pas profiter à tous, les départements ruraux ayant beaucoup de difficultés à retrouver le marché d’avant crise”, indiquent les Notaires de France.

http://www.lexpansion.com/immobilier/immobilier-l-ecart-se-creuse-entre-les-villes-et-les-campagnes_241826.html?xtor=EPR-175

 

  • »
  • »
  • »
  • »
  • »
  • »
  • »
  • »
  • »
  • »
  • »
  • »
  • »
  • »
  • »
  • »
  • »
  • »
  • »
  • »
  • »
  • »
  • »